Tag: media release

Media Advisory | June 25-2018

Media Advisory | June 25-2018

MEDIA ADVISORY Sixties Scoop Survivors to Canada and Law Firms: Renegotiate National Settlement Fees Now, Give Back Remaining Funds to Survivors! (Ottawa/Unceded Algonquin Territory – June 25, 2018) – The National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network is dismayed that the Sixties Scoop settlement is […]

NISCWN Demands Quick Renegotiation

NISCWN Demands Quick Renegotiation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Sixties Scoop Survivors Network Welcomes National Settlement, Demands a Quick Renegotiation of Legal Fees and a Just Settlement for Métis and Non-Status Survivors (Ottawa/Algonquin Territory – June 21, 2018) – The National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network welcomes the announcement yesterday […]

National Rally 2018 Media


Sixties Scoop survivors call on Moe to take action


On Friday in Saskatoon, the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Saskatchewan (SSISS) will participate in a national day of solidarity with a rally and march, beginning at noon at the Vimy Memorial bandstand near 20th Street and Spadina Crescent.

Sixties Scoop Survivors Unite for Day of Solidarity

First Nations, Métis and Inuit Sixties Scoop survivors hold a rally on Parliament Hill to show solidarity with fellow survivors across Canada. An estimated 20,000 Indigenous children were removed from their homes between the late 1950s and 1980s, and were placed in foster care or adopted out to non-Indigenous families.

The rally in Ottawa is part of the first Sixties Scoop national day of solidarity called for by the National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network (NISCWN). The eight other cities holding rallies are Montreal, Winnipeg, Victoria, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Toronto, Vancouver, and Whitehorse.

Colleen Cardinal and Duane Morrisseau-Beck, two of NISCWN’s co-founders, address the crowd, along with several survivors. (March 16, 2018) (no interpretation)

Click Here for full video.

http://www.cpac.ca/en/programs/headline-politics/episodes/60563239

A series of rallies across the country were held Friday in support of survivors of the Sixties Scoop, with some advocating for a better settlement than the one announced last fall by the federal government. That settlement aims to compensate all First Nations and Inuit children who were removed from their homes and communities — and lost their cultural identities as a result — between 1951 and 1991. The National Indigenous survivors of Child Welfare network organized the rallies to push back against the proposed $800-million settlement.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/toronto-sixties-scoop-rally-pushes-back-against-government-settlement-1.4580255

Sixties Scoop survivors call for Sask. apology and for healing to begin

Sask. government says apology coming ‘as soon as possible’ following consultations.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/sixties-scoop-survivors-apology-saskatchewan-government-1.4578745


Sixties Scoop survivors rally in Saskatoon for solidarity and a fair settlement

60s Scoop demonstrations unfold across the country

Rallies across the country happened Friday for survivors of the 60s Scoop.

About three dozen people stood in the cold wind on Parliament Hill, an event organized by the National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network (NISCWN).

They wore purple arm bands, a healing colour in some Indigenous cultures.

The event was in part about healing for the thousands of Indigenous kids that were taken from their homes and put with non-Indigenous people.

http://aptnnews.ca/2018/03/16/60s-scoop-demonstrations-unfold-across-country/

Skylar S., 15, and her sister Aponi, 12, right, whose mother is a Sixties Scoop survivor, hold signs during a national solidarity rally called by the National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, March 16, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Survivors of the ’60s Scoop converged in Canadian cities Friday to draw attention to the historical injustice they say the government hasn’t gone far enough to address.

The rallies took place in nine Canadian cities, including Ottawa, Vancouver, Montreal and Whitehorse.

In the 1960s, Indigenous children were plucked from their homes and placed into non-Indigenous households. While the government has attempted to address the historic wrong through negotiating a national settlement with survivors, the current iteration of that settlement does not extend to Métis and non-status Scoop survivors.

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/03/16/survivors-of-60s-scoop-hold-rallies-in-nine-canadian-cities/

http://whitehorsestar.com/News/60s-scoop-survivors-plan-solidarity-day

 

Several hundred people took to the streets in major cities across Canada on Friday to stand in solidarity with survivors of the Sixties Scoop.

Many survivors and experts on the Sixties Scoop have spoken of the devastating impact this part of Canadian history has had on First Nations, Inuit and Metis communities.

The Sixties Scoop was a period of time in Canada where many Aboriginal children were taken from their families by child welfare agents and placed in predominantly non-Indigenous homes.

Many survivors have spoken about how this process almost killed their cultural identity.

“I didn’t even know I was Cree,” said survivor Melissa Parkyn, originally from Moosomin First Nation. “I lost a lot, but I am fortunate to be here today to tell my story.”

At a rally in Saskatoon, many carried signs that read, “No Metis, no non-status, no settlement,” “Let us tell our stories” and “Stolen children equals cultural genocide.”

https://www.mbcradio.com/2018/03/hundreds-stand-solidarity-sixties-scoop-survivors

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CPAC News | Solidarity Rally

CPAC News | Solidarity Rally

  Sixties Scoop Survivors Unite for Day of Solidarity First Nations, Métis and Inuit Sixties Scoop survivors hold a rally on Parliament Hill to show solidarity with fellow survivors across Canada. An estimated 20,000 Indigenous children were removed from their homes between the late 1950s […]

Day of Solidarity

Day of Solidarity

SIXTIES SCOOP NETWORK | NISCW NETWORK MEDIA ADVISORY “I’m not the Only One:” Sixties Scoop Survivors Unite for Day of Solidarity (Ottawa/Algonquin Territory – March 12, 2018) FACEBOOK EVENT CLICK HERE On Friday March 16th, First Nations, Métis and Inuit Sixties Scoop Survivors will be hosting […]

Sixties Scoop National Day of Solidarity

Sixties Scoop National Day of Solidarity

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

sixties scoop network,National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, NISCW, The Network, Sixties Scoop, Indigenous, First Nations, Inuit, Indigenous Adoptee, Indigenous Foster Care, sixties scoop national day of solidarity
Click Here to visit our Facebook Event Page

Sixties Scoop National Day of Solidarity | March 16th

To organize, join or volunteer at the Sixties Scoop National Day of Solidarity near you on March 16, 2018, click this link to visit our Facebook event page.

For more information, please contact:

Duane Morrisseau-Beck, Director and Co-Founder NISCW Cell: (613) 252-2226

Elaine Kicknosway, Director and Co-Founder, NISCW Cell: (613) 864-9016

Colleen Cardinal, Coordinator and Co-Founder, NISCW Cell: (613) 407 7057

Vicky Boldo, Director, NISCW Cell: (514) 210-6663

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Day of Solidarity 2018

Day of Solidarity 2018

MEDIA ADVISORY: March 16th Sixties Scoop National Day of Solidarity: (January 29- Ottawa/Algonquin Territory) On March 16th, 2018, Sixties Scoop Survivors from across the country will be holding rallies as part of the first National Sixties Scoop Day of Solidarity. For more information, please contact: […]

NISCWN Response to Class Action Exclusions | Press Conference

NISCWN Response to Class Action Exclusions | Press Conference

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network news conference | October 10, 2017 In response to exclusion of Métis and non-status Survivors being excluded from class action settlement. [gview file=”http://niscw.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/NISCW-Press-Release-Oct-10.pdf”] Please follow and like us:

MEDIA ADVISORY | FRIDAY OCT 6 2017

logo, sixties scoop network, national Indigenous survivors of child welfare network, sixties scoop, media advisoryMEDIA ADVISORY | Friday Oct 6 2017

Sixties Scoop Survivors to Canada: Fund Healing, Include Métis Survivors

 

(Ottawa, Algonquin Territory, October 6, 2017) Media Advisory.

Following Minister Carolyn Bennett’s announcement of an agreement in principle for a National Settlement for Sixties Scoop survivors today, the National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network (NISCW) is reminding Canada that it owes reparations to all survivors- including Métis – and that survivors need to be directing healing efforts.

What: Indigenous Survivors Respond to Sixties Scoop Settlement.

When: Tuesday, October 10, 10am.

Where: Charles Lynch Room, Centre Block, Parliament Hill.

Who: The National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network.

Why: As Sixties Scoop Survivors, we are the experts on healing.

 

Media Advisory: Network Coordinator Colleen Cardinal’s message to Canada: “Canada committed genocide against Indigenous peoples by trafficking Indigenous bodies through the colonial child welfare system during the Sixties Scoop. Canadians still benefit from our loss of land, language and culture, but this settlement is an important step towards addressing Canada’s crimes. We will continue to stand with Métis survivors in seeking justice for all Sixties Scoop Survivors. We will stand up for healing programs by and for Survivors- national gatherings, supports for restoration of culture and language, and repatriation – so that all survivors of the Sixties Scoop can come home.”

Thousands of Indigenous children were removed from their families by Canada during the Sixties Scoop. In February 2017, Ontario Sixties Scoop survivors won a landmark class action lawsuit. Justice Belobaba’s finding that Canada had breached its ‘duty of care’ by removing Indigenous children from their families and nations led to the out-of-court negotiations that culminated in the proposed settlement.

The Network is demanding that Canada fund Sixties Scoop survivor organizations and to work towards an inclusive reparations package for all survivors.

Network Director Duane Morrisseau-Beck states: “Now is our time as survivors to assess what we need to heal and move forward. All of us – First Nations, Métis, and Inuit survivors – need to be leading this process and consulted on further steps. No other National Aboriginal Organizations have been providing the support and healing work needed by survivors. Indigenous families are still affected by violence from the state. Now is the time to ensure these ties are no longer broken.”

Contact:

Colleen Cardinal, Coordinator and Co-Founder, NISCW Cell: (613) 407-7057

Duane Morrisseau-Beck, Director and Co-Founder NISCW Cell: (613) 252-2226

Elaine Kicknosway, Director and Co-Founder, NISCW Cell: (613) 864-9016

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Sixties Scoop settlement: Money can’t buy back culture

Sixties Scoop settlement: Money can’t buy back culture

Colleen Cardinal of National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, “Money can’t buy back culture.” https://youtu.be/_cszX51H8qE Colleen Cardinal of National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network, “Money can’t buy back culture.” News and Movement Please follow and like us: